Biography

Molly Cross-Blanchard is a white and Métis poet, educator, and editor born on Treaty 3 (Fort Frances, ON), raised on Treaty 6 (Prince Albert, SK), and currently living on the unceded territories of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples, cka Vancouver, where she’s working on a novel. She currently teaches creative writing at Kwantlen Polytechnic.

Molly has a BA in English from the University of Winnipeg and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Her areas of creative interest are shame, sexuality, body image, anxiety and depression, pop culture, settler-Indigenous relations, and romantic love. Her poetics are plainspoken and confessional.

Micro-interview

Did you read poetry when you were in high school? Is there a particular poem that you loved when you were a teenager?

Not at all! I found poetry a few years later, when I got my heart broken. I started thinking and writing in feelings rather than sentences. And then I had to put in the work to do it well. I was a big fan of Leonard Cohen, Billy Collins, and Kayla Czaga in the early days. 

When did you first start writing poetry? And then when did you start thinking of yourself as a poet?

I suppose the first poem would be very early, maybe 1st grade. But I didn't really start thinking of myself as a poet until I published my first poem at 22 years old. I collected my forty bucks and then felt justified to own that title.

What do you think a poet’s “job” is?

To be honest. To connect with themselves. To pay attention.

If you have a poem in our anthology what inspired you to write it?

I was having a hard time and wanted to see a healer to get some perspective. A friend recommended this "shaman" who she claimed was amazing, so I went. It was a bit appropriative, and I felt uncomfortable at times, but I did end up having some visions. Dogs, beavers, and children. But when I came out of the ritual, the shaman told me she found my power animal: a dolphin. I resented this, and then eventually became obsessed with dolphins. Three poems came out of that experience.

If you had to choose one poem to memorize from our anthology, which one would it be?

It would be "all you can is the best you can" by Selina Boan. The language here is so balanced - equal parts statement and musing, formal and casual, imagistic and voice-forward. And experiencing the emotional journey alongside the speaker just feels like a comforting hug.

Poems

Publications

Title
Exhibitionist
Publisher
Coach House Books
Editors
Susan Holbrook, Alana Wilcox
Date
April 2021
Publication type
Book
Title
I Don't Want to Tell You
Publisher
Rahila's Ghost Press
Editors
Selina Boan, Mallory Tater
Date
September 2018
Publication type
Book
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